Archive | March 2014

Hawaii, Part 3

The Big Island of Hawaii is a remarkable place.  Beaches with sands that vary from white, to black, to green sand sit a short drive from a 13,000 foot mountaintop.  Sea turtles, whales, and a variety of coral fish call the crystal clear waters home.  Lush, tropical rainforest are intermixed with barren deserts created by lava flows.  Water and fire simultaneously work to sculpt and define the geography, and humans cling to it all to enjoy the beauty and the fertility of the ground here.  The beauty lies in the diversity, and the diversity exists because of the unstable nature of the ground beneath your feet.

We were lucky enough to spend a week on the Big Island in February, and we quickly realized that a week is far too short.  We did a lot, saw a lot, and still left feeling like we had barely scratched the surface.

Part 1

Part 2

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Hawaii, Part 2

The Big Island of Hawaii is a remarkable place.  Beaches with sands that vary from white, to black, to green sand sit a short drive from a 13,000 foot mountaintop.  Sea turtles, whales, and a variety of coral fish call the crystal clear waters home.  Lush, tropical rainforest are intermixed with barren deserts created by lava flows.  Water and fire simultaneously work to sculpt and define the geography, and humans cling to it all to enjoy the beauty and the fertility of the ground here.  The beauty lies in the diversity, and the diversity exists because of the unstable nature of the ground beneath your feet.

We were lucky enough to spend a week on the Big Island in February, and we quickly realized that a week is far too short.  We did a lot, saw a lot, and still left feeling like we had barely scratched the surface.

Part 1

Hawaii, Part 1

The Big Island of Hawaii is a remarkable place.  Beaches with sands that vary from white, to black, to green sand sit a short drive from a 13,000 foot mountaintop.  Sea turtles, whales, and a variety of coral fish call the crystal clear waters home.  Lush, tropical rainforest are intermixed with barren deserts created by lava flows.  Water and fire simultaneously work to sculpt and define the geography, and humans cling to it all to enjoy the beauty and the fertility of the ground here.  The beauty lies in the diversity, and the diversity exists because of the unstable nature of the ground beneath your feet.

We were lucky enough to spend a week on the Big Island in February, and we quickly realized that a week is far too short.  We did a lot, saw a lot, and still left feeling like we had barely scratched the surface.  Below is the first round of images from our trip.

Another Day in Paradise

This weekend I got the chance to fish Puget Sound with two guys from Philadelphia, Caleb and Brian, who were in Seattle for a 3 day convention.  The weather was everything you’d expect of a March day in the Northwest:  constant rain, fog, and just enough bite in the air to keep things interesting.  One thing that was missing from the day (surprisingly…..and thankfully), was the wind that can turn an unpleasant day into an unbearable one.  One thing that wasn’t missing from the day:  fish.  We saw fish jumping, and had swirls and takes on every beach we stopped at–a bit of a rarity for this time of year.

On the ferry ride back to Seattle we were some mixture of soaked, tired, and content from a successful day of chasing cutthroat on the Sound.  All in all, another day in paradise.